BBC Comedy Boss Says Comedy Should Be Politically Correct Rather Than Funny

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After the head of BBC comedy Mark Allen commented that TV shows like Monty Python’s Flying Circus could not be made today because they were “too white, too posh and too politically incorrect” and that audiences were tired of the “metropolitan, educated experience” and craved sketch shows and sitcoms with a “sense of place” rather than “six Oxbridge white blokes.”

Ex Python John Cleese has defended the iconic comedy show, calling it “remarkably diverse for its time.”

Referring to Allen as the “head of social engineering,” Cleese defended the diversity credentials of Monty Python, joking that the show would meet the state-funded broadcaster’s diversity targets as it had a “poof” – referring to the late Graham Chapman – and “no slave owners.”

From its beginning in 1969, Monty Python’s Flying Circus ran as a sketch show of half – hour episodes until 1974 was followed up by a series of movies which have since become cult classics including Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Monty’ Python’s The Meaning of Life, and The Life of Brian, which lampoons the life of Jesus Christ, all of which it must be said, generate more laughter among the BBC’s beloved “16 to 24 demographic” that the parade of sad, self loathing losers paraded in the BBC’s current comedy output. These posh, ethnically and sexually diverse but monoculturally untalented millennials tend to take the stage, spout ten minutes of extreme left wing propaganda, five minutes of middle class angst and conclude with one of three standard punchlines: (1) Aren’t Conservatives horrible, (2) Isn’t Donald Trump horrible, (3) White people are all racists.

Surreal and absurdist in style, Monty Python often pushed the boundaries of what was acceptable at the time, in sketches featuring cross dressing and poking fun at Britain’s class structure.

In the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail, which mocks Arthurian legend, class-conscious peasants of an “anarcho-syndicalist commune” discuss the merits of constitutionalism with a feudalist King Arthur.

The Life of Brian meanwhile, sees Eric Idle’s Stan, a member of anti-Roman independence movement the People’s Front of Judea, express his desire to “be a woman,” requesting from then on that he be called “Loretta” by his (“or her”) fellow revolutionaries.

Cleese,78, also  accused Allen of being “the latest in a long line who don’t really know what they’re doing,” at the BBC, recalling that executives at the corporation in the 1960s were skeptical of the Monty Python’s merits when the show was first pitched and aired. In the
Python era it was regularly the case that what was hated by authority was loved by the public, now it seems what is loved by authority is ignored by the public, while thirty year old shows on archive channels pull bigger audiences than the politically correct shite of the current output.

 

 

 

 

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