So Turing Got It Wrong?

I encounter many articles from sources between eager geeks, silicon valley billionaire pasychopaths and highly qualified academics on topics related to artificial intelligence, neural networks and deep learning. But as they witter on about algorithms, big data and ever more powerful computers they do not seem to grasp  there is more to human conscious intelligence which we are nowhere near to understanding but which must be understood if we are to to model human intuition.

The Turing Test, developed in the 1950s by computer pioneer Alan Turing was intended to discriminate between humans and machines by asking  certain questions of a machine or a human and observing answers which a human is expected to give and that would be impossible for a machine to answer. We can consider this emotional intelligence as an area the machine would not be able to understand.

The only machine yet claimed to have passed the test was presented to judges as a 12 year old Ukrainian boy who had not been learning English for very long. Nothing like cheating to get the result you want is there? Machine learning models can learn some probabilistic parameters to come up with an output representations but cannot understand the emotions or expression or feelings behind a statement.

There is more than just probability estimation in human intelligence. A more relevant question is how can we model consciousness? If we could model consciousness,we could then have an understanding whether an individual is experiencing an emotion and that it will reflect in the way it is giving out those answers.

So the ultimate question is “How do we model Consciousness?”

That’s is the great question all the people who post on A I, neural networks, deep learning and the rest should be able to answer, but cannot.

We have no idea how human consciousness evolved, what triggered that leap from the mammal mind (some would say the mammal brain, because the mind is the home of that mystery which makes us human.) Both evolutionists and religionists agree there is “something” about humankind that separates us from even the large brained animals, but nobody can explain what a human mind actually is.

Some years ago I had an extended stay in hospital after a catastrophic brain haemorrhage. It took out about 35% of my brain tissue and the initial prognosis was there would be little left of what made me who I am. Amazingly my memory, together with language and cognitive skills survived almost intact (I was paralyzed on one side but I was still me.) Nobody was offering explanations though I asked many times, wanting to understand what had happened to me, until some months later, while talking to an endocrinologist who was investigating the blood disorder that had led my blood pressure to spike, and he said, “We are only just beginning to understand that the brain and the mind are two very different things.”

What is the human mind? How does it relate to the brain? Dogs, Chimpanzees and Dolphins can be playful and can relate to members of other species, but they cannot handle abstract ideas. Why do we not see animals with minds? There are no physical characteristics of the human brain that suggest they provide thecreative and processing power that defines human thought and problem solving skills.

If we think of just a few of the qualities which make homo sapiens sapiens (literally ‘man who knows he knows’) unique among all living creatures we start to get an idea of the magnitude of task facing those who aspire to create human — like intelligence in a computer.

I have always said, “the only way we can hope to create true artificial intelligence is by radically redefining what we mean by intelligence.”

 

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