Cash-Strapped’ National Health Service Is Funding ‘Reiki’ Spiritual Therapy

When I saw the headline (above) to this story, I just felt that even in these dying days of blog.co.uk, Jenny Greenteeth can still deliver a toxic bite. And so I posted this brief rant A reminder to those who screech that we must pour ever greater amounts of money into the NHS just exactly what kind of shit the bean counters and bureaucratic empire builders have been wasting our tax cash on to get the service into the catastrpohic state it finds itself in now.

May I add that I’ve nothing against Reiki (or homeopathy, or acupuncture), mere mention of which is enough to make the internet army of science tits go off on a massive hatefest, but as those things offer doubtful benefits, I feel that people who want such services should pay practicioners out of their own pockets. I mean, if we are paying for laying on of hands, what next? Exorcism on the NHS? Voodoo spells on the NHS? And as laying on of hands, i.e. hand jobs has been mentioned, how about prostitutes on the NHS?

Should anyone disagree with me on this, I will take it as your offer to pay for my Chateuneuf-Du-Pape and Chablis Premier Cru, both of which contribute far more to my continued good health that a head rub, a drink of water and a prick with a needle would.

Psychic Power

This is not by best piece ever by a long way but I just had to write that headline.

Lancashire psychic Joe Power (see, I told you I had to write the headline) a wannabe celebrity psychic whose by line is (portentous chords) “He sees dead people didn’t see trouble coming his way from live(ish) people when he fell foul of the Merseyside Skeptics Society who question his claim to have supernatural abilities.

We’d love to be able to tell you Joe’s claim is actually true because he holds down a day job as a morgue attendant but we could get no information to back that up. We do have information on Merseyside Skeptics Society however. They are the arseholes who earlier this year staged a mass overdose protest against homeopathy. As we reported at the time the Merseyside Skeptics Society (calm down, calm down) got very excited about the sale of homeopathic remedies in Boots Chemist. To “prove” homeopathy is a fraud they gathered outside the Liverpool branch of Boots and drank amounts of homeopathic medicine that vastly exceeded the recommended dose. Then they didn’t die and claimed they had proved homeopathic remedies were useless despite the information on the remedies’ packaging clearly stating “There’s one born every minute,” and on the other side “Exceeding the recommended dose will not harm you.”

I would say the sceptics proved at least one claim made by homeopaths is true.

Back to Psychic Power however. He has alleged that Merseyside Skeptics Society have been conducting a campaign of harassment against him. Nonsense a spokesman for the sceptics said: All we have done is say his powers are mythical. Maybe the thkeptic thpokthperthon wath trying to say mystical but had a thpeech impediment. Could a psychics powers be mythical, like King Arthur or Robin Hood or Jason and the Argonauts? Is there anything in classical literature about The Mythical Mystic of Mykonos? No? Oh well, worth a try.

So in the end does Joe Power have the power? We don’t know, nor do we care much in fact we were happy to have never heard of him until the Merseyside Skeptics Society gave the life giving oxygen of free publicity to his career as the man who speaks to the dead.

The Sceptics on the other hand we have to feel sorry for. The irrational faith in reason and logic of people who go to great lengths and waste their hard earned proving something known to be harmless is actually harmless makes them sadder than the people who ask Psychic Power to contact Great Uncle Fred and ask him where he hid the keys to the safe deposit box. On the other hand if the sceptics really want to scupper Psychic Power’s career they could try putting a curse on him.

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Victoria’s Secrets

Last year or was it 2008, time goes so quickly in blogland, we reported on a pair of Queen Vic’s Knicks coming up for auction and fetching a right old bundle. The outside (50 inch waist) bloomers were auctioned at the salerooms of Hanson’s of Derby and the hammer fell at £4,500.

Reasons why the garment fetched such a price are hinted at in our linked article.

Why are they blethering on about something they posted over a year ago? you might well ask.

Well if you are a fan of all things royal or a Regina-eroticist you might be interested to learn Queen Victoria’s silk stockings are now being sold by private collector (nudge, nudge) The items will be knocked down at the Lyon and Turnbull Auction in Edinburgh on 24 March. Though not as highly prized by collectors as the knickers Queen Vic’s Stockings are expected to attract bids in the region of £400.

What this proves to us when seen in the light of the row about homeopathy (reported at the Daily Stirrer) currently raging between the “Science is God” lobby and the “it’s hippies own business what they spend their money on” freethinkers is that what people spend their hard – earned on truly is their own business. Even at £400 a pair for ancient stockings.

Homepathy is endorsed by members of the royal family of course. We cannot comment on whether that has any bearing on the value of Queen Vic’s underwear athough as homeopathy allegedly works through a memory of a substance being stored in water maybe there is a memory of Victoria’s majesty in the gusset of her pants.

Homeopathy: A Massive Overdose Protest

It is strange the Boggart Blog team finds that mere mention of the word “homeopathy” will send the science-is-god fellowship into a spluttering, incoherent, apoplectic rage. At risk of bringing the wrath of the evangelical scientists upon us then:

HOMEOPATHY, HOMEOPATHY, HOMEOPATHY.

The reasons for that apparently redundant repetition will become apparent.

My own view is that I have never tried homeopathic remedies and do not intend to. What pisses me off about the homeophobics is that one cannot simply say “I know bugger all about it, if people think it works for them well, it’s their life.” A homeophobic cannot leave it at that, they will not let you be neutrally uninterested, oh no. They have to try to bully you into agreeing with them.
“But the stuff is diluted so much blah blah,” they scream. Yeah, am I bovvered, I don’t use it.

“But its unscientific, there’s no scientific evidence…” Yeah, so what. The flight of bees is unscientific but I’m not going to stop eating honey.

Many people believe homeopathic remedies have cured long standing complaints in the way I believe a couple of glasses of red wine several times a week protects me against swine flu, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and The Dreaded Lurgi in a way that no vaccine or drug ever could. The science-is-god faction cannot just accept these are opinions, they are determined to not allow anybody to think anything that is not scientific. They have to start ranting about how there is no scientific evidence to support claims that homeopathy works (which apparently proves it does not work) and that an excess of alcohol can result in many serious health problems later in life.

Their favourite tactic when faced with demonstrations that somebody has suddenly showed a gobsmacking lack of symptoms shortly after taking a homeopathic remedy is to put it down to pure coincidence.

Like all fringe religious cults the science is religion cult attracts a lot of nutters who would probably make great homeopaths if they could overcome their prejudices.

There are probably many such nutters in the Merseyside Sceptics Society (which should be named the Merseyside Selective Sceptics Society, you can bet they are not in the least sceptical about climate change science or the large hadron collider) who today will be indulging their OCD – like need to go on about how unscientific homeopathy is by getting together outside Boots Chemist in Liverpool and staging a mass overdose protest against the chain store selling homeopathic remedies. Protesters claim they will eat who bottles of homeopathic pills to show the medications are not effective. Similar protests are taking place around the world.

A spokesman for the Selective Sceptics said Boots should stop selling these “medicines” because it is promoting “unscientific thinking.” A Boots spokeman said the company does not force anyone to buy homeopathic medicince, they are simply responding to customer demand.

Do you spot the failure of logic on the part of the selective sceptics here. There are many conventional treatments a small does of which will cure but which can be eaten in much larger quantities without harm resulting. So isn’t the protest as unscientific as the protesters say homeopathy is? Oh well religious cults, even the science-is-god cult have never been big on that common sense kind of logic.

What would really be a wonderful coincidence however is if one or two of the protesters collapse and die of strokes or heart attacks after eating their massive protest overdose of pills.

Now you know why “homeopathy” is so massively overused in this blog post.

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