Why the U.S. Progressive Left is Misreading the Democratic Base

We just had to bring the first few paragraphs of this rather long article over from Medium.com, there are a few really good laughs in it.

Munr Kazmir
Jun 20, 2019 · 4 min read

Two words: Boaty McBoatface.

Women’s March on NYC 2019. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) (photo: Dimitri Rodriguez)

Who is Boaty McBoatface, you ask? You might also ask why pop-star Pit Bull once played a tiny town in Alaska. Or why Greenpeace named a whale Mister Splashy Pants.

The answer to those questions, and the reason the new progressive strong-arm of the Democratic Party is seriously misreading the Democratic voting base, and overestimating support for extremely far left policies, is the same:

Online voting contests.

The cutting-edge scientific polar research vessel, Boaty McBoatface, was ignominiously christened in 2016 after an online contest to name the underwater submersible went, let’s just say, awry. The naming contest was hijacked by a group that organized online into a kind of mob, and completely skewed the results of what essentially amounted to a poll.

“What should we name this vessel?” was the poll question. An actual, genuine sample of the city’s population, or even the nation’s, would have likely yielded one of the many other perfectly acceptable and reasonable names.

The vessel’s owner, Britain’s Natural Environment Research Council wasn’t exactly thrilled; scientists and scientific journals were outraged.

In a perfect polling world, Boaty McBoatface would now be called the Shackleton, after the world-famous polar explorer, or the Endeavor.

Ah, but polls aren’t perfect, are they?

Polls are by definition flawed from the outset. They reflect a sample of people willing to be polled, not a sample of everyone. People with strong opinions on the subject, one way or another, are generally more willing to answer in a poll.

Most people, however, simply don’t care enough to participate. People have lives. Some people have lives that include three jobs, school, a family and little time to indulge in rigging online voting contests or twitter flame wars.

The number of these online contests that are hijacked by a large online group are myriad.

In 2007, Greenpeace sponsored an online naming contest for a killer whale. Mister Splashy Pants beat out Kaimana (Hawaiian for “power of the ocean”) and Shanti (Sanskrit for “tranquility”) with a whopping 78% of the online vote.

The new town dump in Austin, Texas almost became “The Fred Durst Society of the Humanities and Arts”, the clear winner in an online naming poll.

When Taylor Swift announced an online contest to select a U.S. school where she would perform a free concert, the Horace Mann School for the Deaf received the most votes.

An online poll for fans to choose a destination for Justin Bieber’s “My World” tour ended when “fans” elected to send the singer to North Korea on what was a presumably to be a one-way trip. Continue reading

Jimmy Savile reincarnate?

A Middlesborough man was arrested after he collected hundreds of videos of children that he convinced into trusting by posing as Justin Bieber online

The BBC reported Monday 35-year-old Robert Hunter has been sentenced to 14 years in prison for inciting children to engage in sexual activity and for collecting indecent photos.

A young girl in in Tasmania called police after Hunter tried to solicit her, which allowed them to track where the indecent messages were coming from.

Hunter was charged with more than 30 counts of these crimes after police found 800 videos of young boys and girls stripping and revealing themselves on camera.

The Hunter presented himself as pop star Justin Bieber from 2010 to 2012 and told young girls that he would be their boyfriend if they would strip and perform certain acts on camera.

So how did he get away with it? Take a look at our secret twins shots below…

Jimmy SavileJustin Bieber
Top: Robert Hunter … Below: Justin Bieber. Almost indistinguishable.