Macron Threatens G20 On Climate Then Backs Off

France’s boy president and current climate scaremonger in chief and leading European federalist Emmanuel Macron arrived in Japan for the G-20 summit full of sound and fury, which like the stuff of Macbeth’s soliloquy in Shakespeare’s play turned out to signify nothing. Having started with a threat that France would refuse to sign the concluding statement unless it included a renewed committment to actions agreed in The Paris Accord of 2015 according to Bloomberg.

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French boy president Emmanuel Macron and Prime minister Abe of Japan: (picture: Reuters)

If we are not able to get around a table and defend the climate, then France won’t go along with it,” he said. “It’s that simple.”

Then, probably because is aides were reminding him in stage whispers that The Paris Accord did not committ some of the world’s biggest carbon dioxide emitters, including China, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Mexico and Turkey to do anything on the grounds that they are ‘developing nations, the boy president began to backpedal. One of his entourage suggested that it was impossible to discuss hypotheticals, and another said that the threat wasn’t a threat – rather, Macron was simply indicating France’s priorities.

European Council President Donald Tusk took issuer with Macron’s comments, saying during the Thursday press session that G20 leaders should instead help Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe draft a positive final declaration rather than threatening to boycott it.

Hours later, Macron rewound his position during a press conference with Abe, saying that he had only meant if France’s climate initiatives weren’t adopted, “We’ll have met for nothing.”

By Friday, Macron had backpedalled even more, saying only that climate would be a major issue at the G-20, a statement which did not contain a threat of any kind.

As Bloomberg notes, “Climate and bio-diversity have always been major issues for Macron — partly because the landmark 2015 Paris Accord was signed in the French capital while the former Goldman Sachs investment banker was a minister in Francopis Hollande’s socialist government, and we should not forget the even more politically significant fact that the French Green Party made major advances in May’s European parliamentary elections,, to become serious contenders alongside marine Le Pen’s EurosceptIc Rassemblement National to challenge Macron’s globalist, Europhile, neoliberal party. Macron has calculated that voters favoring tougher action on the environment could be an important source of support as he fights to stave off Le Pen’s challenge.

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French Journalists Reject Government Narrative, Show Support For Yellow Vests Yellow Vests

Yellow Vest Protest Still Running After Six Months

Early May saw a lull in the weekly protests by France’s so called Yellow Vest movement which was not surprising after the huge turnout for the Midweek May Day protests on May 1, the traditional workers holiday in many nations.

from Bloomberg:

France’s Yellow Vest demonstrations drew a lower turnout and drifted away from Paris to smaller cities on Saturday, suggesting the movement is weakening as it hits the six-month mark.

Police estimated 18,600 people took to the streets around France, including 1,200 in the capital, on the movement’s 26th Saturday of protests, AFP reported, citing the interior ministry. Last Saturday, police counted fewer than 19,000 protesters nationwide, already the lowest turnout since November.

The Yellow Vests, a decentralized movement that began in opposition to higher gasoline taxes, has expanded its list of grievances to include demands for a higher minimum wage and increased pensions. President Emmanuel Macron last month promised tax cuts for the middle class in an effort to calm the protesters. Still, a poll on Tuesday found that 47% of the French support the Yellow Vests, up 3 points from 10 days earlier.

Turnout at the protests, and the level of violence, has waxed and waned depending on the weekend. Some Saturdays have led to shocking footage of street battles between protesters and police, the ransacking of the Arc de Triomphe and looting of shops and restaurants. On others, the events unfold with little violence. Masked anarchist protesters known as Black Blocs have joined in the demonstrations.

<p>In Paris on May 11, hundreds assembled midday south of the Seine river, in the student-packed neighborhood surrounding the Jussieu university campus. While demonstrations in the French capital remained orderly, Lyon and Nantes were rowdier at times as some protesters threw objects at police officers.

Read more: Why Yellow Vests Remain Thorn in Macron Presidency: QuickTake

With the protests continuing, although the numbers involved have diminished, it shows the anger of the French people at successive governments which want to focus on the problems of Africa and South East Asia, and the push to integrate 27 EU member states into a single political entity, while ignoring the problems faced by middle and working class people in France due to high unemployment, high taxes and rising living costs, Macron faces increasing political pressure. And with elections to the toothless but symbolic European Parliament only a few days away it looks as if his biggest political test to date will turn into a catastrophe for his globalist government. The Republic En Marche (Republic on the Move Party) currently trails the nationalistic, Eurosceptic, Rassemblement National (National Rally) party led by Marine Le Pen in the European Union parliamentary elections on May 26, according to a Harris Interactive poll published Saturday.

Defeat for Macron will bring renewed calls for him to resign and call an election, and should he choose to hold on to power in those circumstances, in all likelyhood it will reinvigorate the protest movement.

French Journalists Reject Government Narrative, Show Support For Yellow Vests Yellow Vests

Throughout the developed world we have witnessed, over the past few years, increased political pressure being applied to news organisations to promote the government line on issues such as multiculturalism and diversity, climate change, vaccines, military interventions and mass surveillance. Some governments have even go so far as to effectively abolish the right of free speech by criminalising so – called ‘hate speech’, a crime where, in common with medieval witch hunts, to be accused is regarded as suffficient proof of guilt. While Silicon Valley new media giants have made no secret of their political biases, even appearing to be vying for the role of official censors of internet content, the corruption of mainstream news journalism has been more insidious.

Though governments in the democratic world have been following a trend towards greater authoritarianism, implementing mass surveillance policies, and clamping down on freedom of expression, resistance is growing, and nowhere more so than France, a nation with a long tradition of anarchic dissent. For six months the ad – hoc protest movement known as Gilets Jaunes (Yellow vests) have protested against the globalist government of ‘boy – president’ Emmanuel Macron, a former investment banker pushed into power by the establishment in a bid to fend of a victory by the nationalist Marine Le Pen and her Rassemblement National (formerly Front National.) The Macron government is seen as ruling in the interests of the rich and of global corporations. The Yellow Vests protests were triggered by punitive fuel taxes, a part of Marcron’s over – ambitious plan to turn France into a net – zero carbon emissions economy, and by rising living costs and high unemployment. Now what began as an expression of dissatisfaction among people on moderate incomes has evolved into something much bigger, something that could change France and further weaken the European Union

Marcon’s response to the protests has been to delpoy the para – military Gendarmerie against the protestors and authorise brutal riot control tactics against unarmed citizens.

police prepare to fire rubber bullets at yellow vests protestors
Police armed with riot guns and rubber bullets confron yellow vests protestors

Now, after supporting the government line so far, the news media have turned on Marcon, whose government is already on the brink of collapse as civil unrest threatens to turn into civil war. Over 300 media organisations, journalists, photographers, and others working to deliver news to French citizens have put their names to a letter denouncing the excessive brutality of the methods used in trying to suppress the protests. Rubber bullets, tear gas, water cannon, baton charges and punishment beatings have all been used against people involved in Gilets Jaunes (Yellow Vest) protests and members of the press corps in the cities and towns of France.

The letter claims that press freedom in France has been suffering for years under both conservative and socialist governments. Macron’s predecessor in office, the socialist Francois Hollande even went so far as to ‘ban’ conspiracy theories, though how that was intended to work we’re unable to say. The general dissatisfaction with all levels of French government entered a new phase following the start of the Yellow Vest protests in November of last year, Franceinfo reports.

“All these forms of violence have physical (injury), psychic (trauma) or financial (broken or confiscated equipment) consequences. We are personally and professionally denigrated and criminalized,” the journal wrote, highlighting the work of journalist David Dufresne who has catalogued at least 698 cases of people being attacked or injured by police at the protests, including 85 journalists.

The signatories to the letter also raised the issue of police demanding press cards, something not always available to independent journalists, saying, “As a reminder, journalism is not a regulated profession. It is not the press card that justifies our profession. That is why we demand that the government take the necessary measures so that law enforcement agencies stop harassing us and let us work freely.”

The issue of police violence towards members of the Yellow Vests has sparked concern from other sectors of society, including medical professionals, who, through their profesional body, said they had never seen so many serious injuries, some of which have included lost hands and eyes, during a protest movement.

Earlier this week, a 19-year-old woman who was so badly injured by police during a protest in Marseille on December 8th filed attempted murder charges against the officers, saying she was hit by a rubber bullet and then brutally beaten by plainclothes officers as she lay on the ground.

According to the 19-year-old, she had only just left work for the day before the assault and has been so badly injured that it took her four months to be able to return to her job in the retail sector.

In another example of excessive police violence, a 72 year old woman who fell to the ground after being hit by a rubber bullet was set on and beaten so badly by police officers as she lay on the ground that she lost an eye. Commenting on the outrage President Macron said he hoped she had learned some wisdom from the incident. It is encouraging that French journalists are no longer prepared to play down such revolting arrougance from the ruling elite.

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Macron applauds the beating of an old woman by police (Picture via http://www.neonnettle.com )

Germany may strike HUGE BLOW to EU In European Elections As Macron Admits brexit Will Destroy EU

The nationalist group that became Germany’s largest opposition party at the last election,  Alternative for Deutschland, has launched an attack  on the globalist European Union bureaucracy, calling on voters to make the EU election a referendum on how the increasingly authoritarian Brussels bureaucracy is running the 27 member bloc. AfD’s parliamentary leader Alexander Gauland told supporters that voter have an opportunity to teach Brussels some humility during the elections at the end of May. In the recent past several prominent figures in the EU have made statements to the effect that public opinion is irrelevant and the elections are a purely cosmetic exercise to maintain the illusion of committment to democracy. The warning comes amid the creation of an alliance between nationalistic, eurosceptic parties, led by Italy’s Matteo Salvini, ahead of the crucial ballot that could force fundamental changes on  the future direction of the EU.

Mr Gauland told AfD activists to send a wake-up call to European establishment figures in the vote. He said: “I really hope that the result of these elections will teach them self-doubt. It could have happened with Brexit but apparently that wasn’t enough for them.”

The German politician was speaking alongside other European political leaders who aim to turn the European Alliance of Peoples and Nations into the most powerful voting bloc in the Parliament. Italy’s deputy prime minister Matteo Salvini is leading the efforts to put together a Europe-wide alliance of nationalist, anti-immigration parties.

Earlier this week, Mr Salvini visited Hungary in a bid to convince Viktor Orban to join the alliance. During the meeting, Mr Orban remarked: “For this, I think Salvini is the most important person in Europe today.”

Anxiety among European Union officials is high, with fears of a Eurosceptic, nationalist victory in the Europe – wide election later this month as polls suggest a surge in support for nationalis and anti – Brussels parties.

Meanwhile France’s Emmanuel Macron, the ultimate Europhile who made his devotion to the ideal of a federal European superstate clear when he signed the treaty of Aachen with Angela Merkel, agreeing to tie France more closely to Germany even as the Yellow Vest protests by groups disillusioned with his globalist administration were tearing his country apart, – admitted in a speech that the bloc’s future could be in doubt as Brexit uncertainty drives a wedge between France and Germany.

When on April 10, UK Prime Minister Theresa May secured a second extension to Brexit, after EU leaders agreed to grant Britain a six-month flexible extension until October 31. French President Macron was the only leader who opposed the effort to secure a deal that would keep Britain ties closely to EU laws and policies, the so called brexit-in-name-only option supported bt Theresa May (it rhymes with ‘betray’,) to force Britain to leave with no deal or stay as an associate member with vastly diminished influence in EU policy making. During the tense day – long standoff in Brussels Marcon argued that wanted to see Britain out of the bloc as soon as possible but was ignored by other EU leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who agreed to delay Brexit until October 31 without attaching strong political conditions to the extension.

The French President believes Brexit is monopolising the European agenda, at the expense of other important issues and the upcoming MEP elections.

For this reason, M. Macron recently admitted Paris and Berlin are at odds over the Brexit issue, with the German economy likely to take a much bigger hit than France because without Britain’s contributions German taxpayers alone will have to prop up the cash burning bureaucracy that runs the EU.

Last week, the French President told reporters he and Ms Merkel were “not completely on the same page” when it comes to Britain’s departure from the bloc.

The frank admission of a rough patch in Franco-German relations is rare from Mr Macron, who has tried to build a close relationship with the German Chancellor to launch an ambitious reform programme for the EU which would push forward the long term plan for political integration into the dreamed of federal superstate.

His comments are also likely to worry europhiles, as the French President has often claimed how important it is that Berlin and Paris “get along” for the future of the EU and even suggested that a rift between the two nations could bring about the demise of the bloc.

Most recently, in an interview on Italian state TV which aired in early March, Mr Macron claimed that the bond between Berlin and Paris is indeed his “first responsibility”. Neeedless to say Macron’s love affair with Berlin goes down like the proverbial lead Zeppelin with French voters who are aware of their country’s history of conflict with Germany.

 

 

 

Paris In Chaos As “Armageddon” Protesters Riot On French May Day Holiday

After six months of street protests against the government of President Emmanuel Macron, the anger of the French people showed no sign of abating this may day holiday as tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets of Paris and other French cities on to mark International Workers’ Day (also known as Labuor Day). Following the pattern of the ‘Yellow Vests’ protests, nobody expected todays efforts to be peaceful  and it was inevitable protestors would  clash with French riot police.

The demonstrators included Yellow Vests, trade unionists, climate change protesters and Black Bloc (antifa) – which posted on social media that they wanted an “Armageddon” rally that would turn Paris into the “Riot Capital of Europe,” according to a report in  The Daily Mail reported today.

Paris Workers Day riots
Paris Workers Day Riots (Picture: Zero Hedge)

 

More than 7,400 police, gendarmes and soldiers were on duty to quell the more violent protesters. Interior Minister Christophe Castaner said “‘There’s no question of dramatising anything, it is a question of being prepared,” adding that “1,000 to 2,000 extremists” were expected to take part in the protests.

Paris police said in the afternoon that 250 people had been arrested, most for public order offences related to the rioting, as cops clashed with ‘Black Bloc’ anti-capitalists. The Sun reported large areas of Paris are on lockdown as an unprecedented 7,400 police officers have been drafted onto the streets.

More May Day riots are expected in the French capital today, tomorrow and through the weekend following the months of chaos caused by ‘Yellow Vest’ protesters. The massive security presence on the streets of French cities was announced by Interior Minister Christophe Castaner. May Day is a Bank Holiday and a traditional time for Left-Wing workers to rise up against the ruling elite echoing the May Day revolution that led to the collapse of the Russian Empire and the formation of The Soviet Union.

Marching alongside workers organisations, pensioners, students and others, the protesters were attacked with of tear gas, water cannon baton carges and other crowd control measures. Our source in France tells us dozens of masked and hooded anarchists clashed with riot police in southern Paris today (Wednesday), burning bins, smashing property and hurling projectiles. The anarchists hijacked a May Day rally that was focused on protesting against President Emmanuel Macron’s policies, and the cost of living increases that have resulted from them.

Tens of thousands of trade union and “yellow vest” protesters were on the streets across France again, days after Macron outlined a response to months of street protests including tax cuts worth around 5 billion euros ($5.6 billion). Macron announced a series of proposals in response to the protesters demands, but many in the grassroots movement, which does not have a leadership structure, have said they do not go far enough and lack detail. The president’s problem is that nobody believes him, previous promises he has made have amounted to no more than creative accounting, moving money from one budget to another.

The increasing involvement of extremists in the protests signal that events are taking a nasty turnm in France and the protests are not likely to end well for anybody.

The founder and former leader of France’s right-wing Front National (FN) party, Mean-Marie Le Pen delivered a May 1 speech at the Place des Pyramides during a rally to honor Jeanne d’Arc. “Let’s have the courage to be nationalists,” he told the crowd, predicting “serious social and political dramas” to come.

Meanwhile in the southern French city of Toulouse, over 1,000 protesters made their way through the streets of La Ville En Rose, however local media has yet to report any violence according to The Local. There was also total media silence in the UK on this story, which should have led most news bulletins.

The yellow vest protests, named after motorists’ high-visibility jackets, began in November over fuel tax increases but have evolved into a sometimes violent revolt against politicians and a government seen as out of touch.

The banners in today’s crowds reflected the anger among some in the movement who feel abandoned by Macron’s economic policies.

The 41-year-old president, a former investment banker, pushed a reform blitz during the first 18 months of his presidency that impressed wealthy business and professional people but infuriated low-paid workers, who feel he favors big business and is indifferent to their struggle to make ends meet.

“Here are the thugs,” one banner read, showing Macron, European Union Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde.

Another targeted the president directly: “Macron, what have you done to us?”

Thousands of people also demonstrated in cities from Marseille to Bordeaux and Lyon, according to a report from Reuters.

It is becoming obvious that the only way France’s ruling elite, for years even more out of touch with the mood of the public that the political establishments in Britain, Germany and The USA, will solve this crisis is for the President and his govrnment to resign and call a new election.

MORE ON FRANCE

 

Macron Isolated After More High Profile Resignations. Pressure Mounts On French President

Macron as Jupiter

On being elected President of France, Emmanuel Macron said he would rule in the style of Roman God Jupiter

On top of the yellow Vests debacle, which is now destabilising France as the anti – government protests continue, a string of high profile resignations from the tottering government of President Emmanuel Macron has prompted Gérard Larcher, leader of the French Senate to warn Macron that his authoritarian tendencies were partly to blame for the civil unrest crisis and political instability that have weakened his presidency.

Mr Macron’s office announced this week that government spokesman Benjamin Griveaux and Digital Affairs Minister Mounir Mahjoubi were leaving the administration, along with European Affairs Minister Nathalie Loiseau. Monsieurs Griveaux and Mahjoubi are said to be planning to launch rival bids for next year’s mayoral election in Paris. The current mayor, Anne Hidalgo, a socialist is seeking re-election.

Mrs Loiseau, was a key player in communicating the French government’s stance on Brexit throughout the unsuccessful negotiations, she will move to head up Mr Macron’s pro-Europe La République en Marche (LREM) party in the May 26 European parliamentary elections.

Mr Griveaux has been government spokesman since November 2017, while Mr Mahjoubi was named digital minister in May 2017. Mrs Loiseau, a career diplomat, joined the Macron government in June 2017. A reshuffle is expected by Monday, the date of the next cabinet meeting, but could be announced early to avoid being bumped down the news bulletins by the coming weekend’s Yellow Vest protests.

In the last eight months, Mr Macron has waved goodbye to his popular ecology minister Nicolas Hulot, ally and interior minister Gérard Collomb, and close advisor Ismaël Emelien.

The latest batch of resignations have further eroded the ceredibility of Macron’s leadership, already undermined by easily supportable claims that he is a president for the rich and the global corporations (The Davosocracy,) and his policies are putting further pressure on low paid and middle income groups in what is now known to be the most highly taxed nation on the planet. The three ministers who quit the government on Wednesday were all assumed to be close allies of Macron. These latest resignations bring the number of cabinet members who have quit since the boy president took office in May 2017 to ten.

“Maybe the [resignations] are a reflection of Mr Macron’s vertical governing style … maybe they reflect the head of state’s growing isolation,” Mr Larcher told Europe 1 radio shortly after the departures were confirmed in an emailed statement.

The spate of ministerial resignations, along with rising living costs, tax increases, immigration and Macron’s push to integrate France more closely politically and economically with germany have all contributed to the discontent that triggered the Yelloiw Vest movement and now has Marcon’s with his political opponents depicting him as an increasingly solitary figure with diminishing popularity and an aura of cluelessness.

Ghosts Of ’68 Threaten Macron’s Technocratic Dream.

The idealistic hope that mass protests and civil disobedience could trigger real social change met with some success in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries but looked to have died after the USA’s 1960s civil rights movement and anti – war protests. The recent mass demonstrations of Frane’s gilets jaunes (yellow vests) movement in 2018, a movement … Continue reading

France: Yellow Vests Rampage After Founder Arrested


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5 January, 2019
Violence has erupted across France once again, days after French authorities arrested a key organizer of the Gilets Jaunes (Yellow Vest) movement. After today’s protests began peacefully the Paris police once again used riot busting tactics, attacking the yellow vested demonstraters with teargas and batons as protesters began to get noisy during the so-called ‘Act VIII” … Continue reading

France’s yellow vest revolt against Macron will cause huge headache in 2019

Since the first incarnation of the EU an The Common Market, FRANCE has always been considered one of the bastions of European stability and a poster state for financial and political integration among European Union countries. But former Goldman Sachs banker Emmanuel Macron has thrown both France’s position as Germany’s chief sidekick and the dream … Continue reading

Germany and France furious after UK joins EU nations to BLOCK bid to dominate technology industry

BRITAIN has teamed up with the Netherlands, Belgium and Spain to block electrical and electronic engineering giants Alstom and Siemens from creating a mega Franco-German corporation to dominate European tech industry. Siemens and Alstom agreed last year to merge certain operations, creating a company with £13.5million (€15billion euros) in revenue and a workforce of 62,000. … Continue reading

Yellow Vests block Major Roads, Cause Transport Chaos In France

Reuters reports French “yellow vest” protesters wreaked havoc with road transport on Tuesday by occupying autoroute toll booths and even torching some of them. France’s biggest toll road operator, Vinci Autoroutes , said there were demonstrations at 40 of its sites and that several highway intersections had been heavily damaged, mainly in southern of France. … Continue reading

More Woe For France’s Macron,Now Gilets Jaunes Joined By Gilets Bleus

Macron fiddles with himself while Frsnce burns (Picture: express) Travellers in France, mainly around Paris, have been hit by delays at airports as French police slowed down passport controls in a protest over overtime pay. As we predicted last weekend, the Yellow Vests protestors are now being supported by the police service. The first action … Continue reading More

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Macron Moves Against yellow Vests, Bans Protests In Neighborhoods With “Ultra” Radicals

 

France is cracking down on “yellow vest” protesters following a weekend of renewed violence – as the Macron administration announced on Monday that it would ban demonstration in several areas of France – including the Champs Elysees in Paris, if “ultra elements” are present, according to Interior Minister Edouard Philippe.

‘We will ban demonstrations if ultra elements’ are present, said Philippe, according to CNEWS.

The ban will apply to “neighborhoods that have been most affected as soon as we have knowledge of” the “ultras.”

“I am thinking of course the Champs-Elysees in Paris, the place Pey-Berland in Bordeaux, the Capitol Square in Toulouse”, Philippe added, where “we will proceed to the immediate dispersal of all groups.”

Philippe added that he has asked the State Judicial Agent to “systematically seek the financial responsibility of troublemakers.”